Videos

What does 2010 hold for music ?

The first decade of the noughties was one of unprecedented change in the way music is consumed online. The first legal file sharing site Wippit came & went but it was iTunes that really impacted the most on music & single handedly revolutionised the charts. Since then Myspace, Youtube came into the fray although with semi legal services. What does 2010 hold for music ?

We believe the freemium juggernaught will continue to make inroads with Spotify, We7 leading the audio way, however the biggest revolution will be made by the likes of Youtube (already the default place for seekers of music who don’t want to risk viruses).

You see the problem with Spotify & others is in the licensing. without a global licensing deal, they will make small dents into illegal filesharing. Semi legal sites like Youtube will continue to flourish. Myhotmusic suggests labels set up their own version using tools that are readily available. Sites such as Youtube, Blip.TV & Muzu.tv are now sharing revenue and labels stand to make a lot more if they use them. It makes a lot of sense for people to watch a video with buy links underneath it & if they want to get the audio they’ll just click through to your site and order it on CD or mp3 rather than put up with the incovenience of saving it and converting it.

Five Star “Let Me Be The One”

One of Britain’s most successful r&b acts and the UK’s answer to the Jacksons. Five Star’s legacy is that they were the first all singing and all dancing UK r&b acts to cross over and become megastars in their own right. With a string of hits, a huge profile and best of all it was totally in-house. They should have had much more success in the U.S than they did.

Michael Jackson “This Is It”

It’s making waves online and is the most anticipated release this year and it was broken on the internet.

Michael Jackson’s new single contains recordings from 1991 and today (featuring his brothers). This is vintage Michael at his best and is set to go all the way to the top. Christmas number one ?

Why Youtube is more important for your next “hit” than radio.

An obscure wedding dance posted online became an instant Youtube hit. It featured the song “Forever” by Chris Brown which is now sitting at number 3 in the iTunes chart and is set to sell thousands all over again.

This tells us all something and that is that in the current climate, Youtube has more of a direct impact on your bottom line than a radio campaign. The problem is that radio campaigns take around 8-16 weeks and by the time your song gets saturated radio play, it would have been on torrent sites all over the world resulting in lost sales.

A Youtube hit paired with a direct call to action i.e an iTunes link will result in immediate sales and chart success. Independent labels and artist need to concentrate on generating a hit song with a hit video instead of greasing the palms of PR companies and pluggers who have very little chance of achieving the sustained radio play that your record needs in order to break into the charts.

Furthermore, it is time to throw out the release schedules and make your song available on iTunes prior to any marketing.

“Colin” the $70 cinema horror flick

Wow ! Imagine this. An “amateur” from the UK, made a movie on his camcorder and is now set to be screen in cinemas all over the world.

“Colin” is a zombie movie filmed from the perspective of the zombie, departing from the “normal” zombie flick storylines.

It made waves in Cannes, has just been picked up for worldwide distribution, and is the perfect “no budget” movie. “Colin” was written and directed by Marc Price, who had no formal filmmaking training but learnt it all from DVD extras. Made for peanuts using every trick in the book to keep the costs low, “Colin” could be the surprise hit movie of 2010.

Get signed by Universal with Tunecore.

In what appears to be a historic deal, Universal and Tunecore have teamed up to discover new talent. What Universal seem to be doing is creating a number of “service oriented” labels (something which I have advocated for in the past).

This enables artists to hire Universal’s departments for a flat fee rather than licensing or assigning their rights to Universal.

The artist and Universal may still be able to do a traditional licensing or “record deal” by mutual decision.

Watch this one closely as it seems pretty interesting indeed. More at:

www.tunecore.com